Based in London; Formerly of New York, Buenos Aires, Fife, and the Western Cape. Saoránach d'Éirinn.
A writer, blogger, historian, and web designer born in New York, educated in Argentina, Scotland, and South Africa, and now based in London. read more

Church of Christ the King, Gordon Square, London

Though a comparitively small and minor sect, assiduous tithing by the members of Catholic Apostolic Church gave that group a number of stunning churches. (Their former church in Edinburgh was the subject of a previous posting).

The building currently known as the Church of Christ the King on Gordon Square in Bloomsbury was constructed by the anachronistically-monikered Irvingites from 1853. The superb structure, built from Bath stone, is incomplete, lacking a few bays on the liturgical west of the building which kept the planned façade from being built. It also lacks a crossing tower, but then so does Westminster Abbey, the nave of which is only thirteen feet higher than that of Christ the King.

Above, a slightly idealized rendering of the church, and below, a more accurate representation.

To really find out about this beautiful church, one should read the words of John Betjeman, who described the building in detail in a letter reproduced here.

From 1963 to 1992, the building was known as the University Church of Christ the King, and was home to the University of London Anglican Chaplaincy. These days it is often used by the Forward in Faith movement in the Anglican Communion under the Anglo-Catholic Bishop of Fulham.

Above can be seen the cathedra used by the Angel of the Catholic Apostolic Church. Angels were more or less their equivalent of Bishops.

A closer view of the High Altar, behind which is the Lady Chapel.

This photograph shows the church in use by the Forward in Faith movement. The Mystery Worshipper attended a Mass for the Feast of Christ the King there in 2001, the report for which can be found at this location.

This post was published on Friday, July 29th, 2005 7:42 pm. It has been categorised under Architecture Church Great Britain.
Comments
Joachim Heinbach
28 Aug 2006 12:37 pm

Are you interested in Literature of the “Catholic Apostolic Congregations”? I can you sent a CD free.

Be blessed.
Yours
J.Heinbach

John Stanley Martin
8 Dec 2007 3:48 am

Not being “computer-wise, I do not understand URL!

In looking up details about Gordon Square for a niece who leaves Australia for Europe next week with her 9-year-old son, I noticed thie website. I observed the words “Are you interested in Literature of the “Catholic Apostolic Congregations”? I can you sent a CD free.” I would like a CD. How can I order it? My niece’s great grandfather was consecreated “angel” at Gordon Square and was the last “angel” in Australia. I was last at Gordon Square at a prayer meeting on 14th July 1999.

Greetings

John M.

Joachim Heinbach
11 Mar 2008 2:48 pm

Dear John Stanley Martin!

Please do contact postal:
Joachim Heinbach
Adlerstrasse 12
D-57078 Siegen (Germany)

or:

http://www.Katholisch-apostolische-gemeinde .de

Walter Reed
25 Nov 2009 7:04 pm

Hello.
I need a fotograph of Gordon Square with the old buldings where is now the university (Numbre 51) about 1907 Thanks

Maureen Agnew
3 Oct 2010 3:42 pm

i was baptized into the Catholic Apostle Church in
Belfast, and will be in London on 18th October, and
is it possible to visit the Church in Gordan Square.
Many years ago I was at a service in the Church at
Maida Vale. Hopeing for a reply.

Colin Robert LOGAN
2 Dec 2013 7:50 pm

I was baptised in the CAC Central church in Gordon Square, and was later an acolyte. As a family we attended the evening service led by the Deacon, Mr Lickfold, who would also read out a sermon previously preached in the church. My Aunt Dorothy lived in the cloisters, as did my Godfather, Norman Priddle, who was the organist. I would love to catch up with any members.

Candy Blackham
19 Dec 2013 4:06 pm

I am following Bradshaw’s Hand Book to London, 1862, and will link to your post. Thank you – the photographs of the interior are wonderful – I must try to get into the church.



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