Monday 21 April 2014
CONTACT | RSS
ABOUT | CATEGORIES | PAGINATED INDEX
Based in London; Formerly of New York, Buenos Aires, Fife, and the Western Cape. Saoránach d'Éirinn.
About
A writer, blogger, and historian, born in New York, educated in Argentina, Scotland, and South Africa, now based in London. read more
Links
Blogs
Reviews & Periodicals
Church
Arts & Design
Scotland
Africa
Cape of Good Hope
France
Netherlands
Mitteleuropa
Scandinavia
Muscovy
India
Argentina
The Levant
Knickerbockers
Academica

The Sovereign Scotch Order of Whisky

The Order of Malta recently paired up with Scotland’s own Adelphi Distillery to produce two variants of Scotch, proceeds from the sale of which support the Order’s worldwide charitable efforts. Adelphi produced a single malt called ‘The Grand Master’ and a blend named ‘Torphichen’, after Torphicen Preceptory, the headquarters of the Order in Scotland until the Reformation. The last Preceptor of the Order in Scotland lamentably converted to Calvinism, surrendered the Order’s lands to the Crown (which were then re-granted to him specifically), and received the title Lord Torphichen (pronounced Tor-fikken). Unlike most peerages, that of Lord Torphichen can be inherited by any assigned heir. In practice, it has descended through the Chiefs of Clan Sandilands, but in principle the holder could decide to designate any old Tom, Dick, or Harry as the next Lord Torphichen.

This post was published on Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 3:30 pm. It has been categorised under Order of Malta Scotland.
Comments
  1. Tim Conroy
    1 December 2009
    3:54 pm

    Hmmm,

    Sounds like it should be pronounced: Lord Tor’Phuk’hem.

    Just had a sup of Black Grouse – not half bad!

    T

  2. Tom
    1 December 2009
    8:59 pm

    Tried to find some here in the US. No go.

  3. Baron v Hetterscheidt
    2 December 2009
    5:08 am

    The Sovereign Military Order of Malta stooping to trade?
    Surely not.

  4. 2 December 2009
    1:45 pm

    Maybe Father M could lay his hands on some.

    I’m a Laphroaig man myself – love me that peat! I wonder how the Grand Master would stack up against it.

  5. Andrew Cusack
    2 December 2009
    2:21 pm

    Robbo, Laphroaig ties with Glenmorangie as the Cusack house scotch. Sadly I’m out of both at the mo, and had to make do with Glenfiddich last night.

  6. Andrew C.
    2 December 2009
    3:52 pm

    Glenlivet, anyone? Never had the stuff myself, but I am in possession of a bottle of 21-year old. Anyone know how it stacks up against the house favorites?

  7. 2 December 2009
    5:32 pm

    If you like Laphroaig, try Llagavulin…

  8. Fr. Stevens
    2 December 2009
    11:38 pm

    The Glenlivet is very nice, and I really like Oban. Very smooth. Happy Advent.

  9. 5 December 2009
    11:35 pm

    And how do we GET it?

  10. 7 December 2009
    12:21 pm

    Right now you can only get it in Britain. It can be imported into the U.S. but only if you buy several cases. Currently there are different groups in the U.S. associations trying to go in on cases. The British Association had a tasting in Lourdes in May and it was quite excellent. Unfortunately they didn’t bring enough ot sell. Robbo, when I get my mitts on a bottle I will call you.

    In regard to the “Baron’s” comment about the Order “stooping” to trade, they have sold wine from their Italian vinyards for years and religious orders have furthered their missions to the sick and the poor by a variety of drinkable offerings since the middle ages.

    Fr. Guy, missed you at the Malta Ball last month– it was a delight to be with you last year. Are you coming in for the Ballo di Savoia this weekend?

  11. Captain Chledowski
    7 December 2009
    7:32 pm

    Fr M.

    Too True. I had a chance to visit Kolossi Castle in Cyprus in 2007. It was the old Commandery of the Knights in Cyprus, and one time HQ after the fall of Acre. They have made and sold a magnificent dessert wine from their grounds there for hundreds of years. You can still buy the wine, but Kolossi Castle was unfortunately seized from the Knights when the Turks invaded. So yes, the SMOM is in the business of trade.

  12. Mr. WAC
    8 December 2009
    3:52 pm

    Fr. M- You took the words out of my keyboard. The professed Knights are aristocrats, sure. But they are also poor religious brothers (and I use the word “poor” in the sense that they are bound to a vow of poverty). Supporting their own order by honest labor is hardly stooping. It is commendable, and very much in keeping with the religious life.

  13. A daughter of Tor'phuk'hem
    6 July 2010
    11:00 am

    I’d be very interested to know where you heard/read that the Torphichen title can be passed on to any old Tom, Dick or Harry, As the current Lord only has four daughters, the information might come in very handy!

    I now desperately want to track down a bottle of this myself, but I have a feeling that this is one whisky that we would not be welcome to drink, despite being so closely connected… maybe that would make it taste all the better?

  14. K. Dontoh
    7 July 2010
    10:22 am

    The Glenlivet- I’ve been familiar with that one since I was about five; this being because I read a book, whose name I forget (something like “Britain as seen by the British”) , that was composed of interviews with various British people, and one worked in the Glenlivet distillery. It’s been my favorite whiskey ever since (of course, I’ve never had a drop of it, because like the man in the book, I’m a teetotaler- another word I first encountered!)
    But has anyone actually tried this particular whiskey?

  15. K. Dontoh
    7 July 2010
    10:25 am

    I’d be very interested to know where you heard/read that the Torphichen title can be passed on to any old Tom, Dick or Harry, As the current Lord only has four daughters, the information might come in very handy!
    Andrew Cusack, 16th Lord Torphichen?

  16. Bruno Sandilands
    16 January 2011
    2:54 pm

    A whiskey especially named after Lord Torphichen? My father would have loved this! He was the Master of Torphichen.

Leave a comment

Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

Comment

Home | About | Contact | Categories | Paginated Index | Twitter | Facebook | RSS/Atom Feed
andrewcusack.com | © Andrew Cusack 2004-present (Unless otherwise stated)