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L’Osservatore Romano goes Hungarian

Magyarophiles will be pleased to learn that L’Osservatore Romano, the Vatican newspaper, will begin appearing in Hungarian. The new edition will appear every other week as a four-page insert into Új Ember, the Hungarian Catholic weekly founded in 1945. “We are a small editorial staff,” Balázs Rátkai, editor-in-chief of the weekly, told L’Osservatore.

“However, our intention is to probe and to make our readers think. The collaboration with the Vatican daily is of historic importance for the life of the weekly and of the entire local Church; it not only brings the Universal Church and the Pope closer to us; it will also enrich readers, and through them all of Hungarian society, with new thoughts, opinions and answers.”

Printed as a daily broadsheet in Italian, the Vatican newspaper also has weekly tabloid editions in French, Spanish, English, German, and Portuguese, as well as a monthly version in Polish.

This post was published on Tuesday, December 17th, 2013 11:20 am. It has been categorised under Errant Thoughts Hungary Newspapers Vatican and been tagged under , , , .
Comments
  1. Baron von Hetterscheidt
    17 December 2013
    8:01 pm

    Well, here is one Magyarophile who is distinctly not pleased.

    The last thing Hungarians need as they fight off the encroachment of the forces of evil (i e the EU and its friends in the international banking fraternity) is the hand-wringing, unsuccessfully baptised liberalism of the OR.
    What Hungarians do need is a rebirth of the spirit of Cardinal Mindszenty, and of Admiral Horthy as well.

  2. Andrew Cusack
    17 December 2013
    11:14 pm

    That is very much the sort of thing we expect the Baron to say.

    But have you been reading the wonderful recollections of Domokos Szent-Iványi in the Hungarian Review? A fascinating man, and brilliant too.

    At the beginning of the second Teleki premiership in February 1939, the PM commissioned a memorandum from Szent-Iványi, then a Foreign Ministry advisor, outlining what he thought was going to happen in Europe. He predicted a war which all of Europe would lose, the American entry into the war (he was a few months off in his prediction of timing, but correct in his analysis that Washington would get in the war in order to defeat the British Empire), and the division of Europe between the US and USSR.

    Of course, for his determination to keep Hungary free of socialism “in both its Marxist and nationalist forms” (as Fr Julian always says in his sermons), Szent-Iványi was imprisoned by the Communists. Luckily he was released during the 1956 Revolution and escaped to Germany, where he wrote his memoirs and lived out the rest of his days.

  3. Baron von Hetterscheidt
    18 December 2013
    8:03 pm

    Since Szent-Ivanyi was a member of Horthy’s trusted inner circle I do not see how evoking him does anything other than reinforce my point.
    In any case, Horthy, and even Mindszenty, were only mentioned tangentially. My real point remains this: the OR was a haven of anti-Benedictine thought during his reign and is now a happy collaborator with the current revolution taking place before our eyes in Rome. Further dissemination of its subversive articles ought not to be encouraged, either in Hungary or anywhere else.

  4. 11 January 2014
    9:07 pm

    Won’t do the Magyarophiles much good unless they’re also Magyarophones.

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