Thursday 23 October 2014
CONTACT | RSS
ABOUT | CATEGORIES | PAGINATED INDEX
Based in London; Formerly of New York, Buenos Aires, Fife, and the Western Cape. Saoránach d'Éirinn.
About
A writer, blogger, and historian, born in New York, educated in Argentina, Scotland, and South Africa, now based in London. read more
News
Blogs
Reviews & Periodicals
Church
Arts & Design
Scotland
Africa
Cape of Good Hope
France
Netherlands
Mitteleuropa
Scandinavia
Muscovy
India
Argentina
The Levant
Knickerbockers
Academica

Well Done, Thou Good and Faithful Servant

From the funeral of the late Fra’ Andrew Bertie.

Tip o’ the hat: Fr. Guy Sylvester

This post was published on Tuesday, February 19th, 2008 7:44 pm. It has been categorised under Order of Malta.
Comments
  1. Robt. Zacher
    20 February 2008
    9:13 pm

    Andrew, I believe your headline here should properly read, “Well Done Thou Good and Faithful Servant,” subsituting Thou for Thy as you have it.

    Assuming the headline is an intentional paraphrase of Holy Scripture, you will find it in Matthrew 25 in two similar wordings, at verses 21 & 23, as part of the Parable of the Five Talents. Verse 23 however is, Perhaps what you were aiming for.

    His lord said unto him, Well done, good and faithful servant; thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things: enter thou into the joy of thy lord. (KJV)

    The words are important in two ways. First, they they are “dominical” – words of Jesus himself which Matthew records as coming from a scene where Jesus speaks in parables to his disciples outside Jerusalem on the Mount of Olives. Second, the words “thou faithful servant …” are addressed not to God but directly to the servant in the parable who was faithful in his duty to his master. One would assume that would neatly describe the life of Fra Andrew.

  2. Old Dominion Tory
    21 February 2008
    8:58 am

    The guard of honor (proper term, I hope) are exceptionally well turned out. Any idea from what unit they were drawn? Also, any idea what the blue sash represents?

  3. 21 February 2008
    3:37 pm

    Mr. Zacher: Thank you for pointing that out; my mind must have been elsewhere!

    ODT: The guard of honor were drawn from the Military Corps of the Order of Malta, which is a medical unit of the Italian Army. Officers of the Italian Army wear blue sashes with their uniforms on ceremonial occasions.

Leave a comment

Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

Comment

Home | About | Contact | Categories | Paginated Index | Twitter | Facebook | RSS/Atom Feed
andrewcusack.com | © Andrew Cusack 2004-present (Unless otherwise stated)